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MARKET RESEARCH

Education in America

 

The United States spends over half a trillion dollars annually to educate our children from kindergarten through high school. There are over 90,000 public schools, 40 million students, 3 million teachers, and 11 million affiliated educational representatives.


Education is the second largest sector in the U.S. economy directly behind health care. A typical school district in an average spending state has nearly 5000 students, 11 schools, and a budget between $30 and $33 million dollars. These figures account for annual per pupil spending of roughly $6500.


Billions of dollars have been spent to help better the American school system and education prospects for millions of students. School district spending has increased at an annual rate of 7% in the last 25 years, more than double the rate of inflation.


Most of the increase has gone to finance a concurrent and deserved increase in teacher compensation. Other initiatives such as student/parent voucher programs, charter schools, the Marshall Plan (including mentors for new teachers, grants for training, and small federal bonuses for math and science teachers), and the infamous No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 have made headlines and, presumably, have dramatically improved the education of millions of students.


To be frank, there no evidence that vouchers work. The trials have been so isolated, unions say, that their results are unproved. Given how few students are involved in voucher programs today, the voucher debate is taking place primarily at the margins. As for charter schools, they account for only a minuscule percentage of the 40 million K-12 students enrolled in public schools; private schools account for 6 million students.


The creation of charter schools grew from a belief held by some that school systems were oppressive, ineffective central governments. Charter school advocates base their argument on the notion that schools will function better if they are organized into smaller and more fragmented systems. Statistics have shown smaller school systems have positive long-term gains, but how practical is this solution on a mass scale?


Large scale systemic change must be at the fore-front of our imagination in order to realistically reform education in America.


As for the Marshall Plan and the long gone No Child Left Behind Act, both reforms laws were critical drivers of educational improvement, but their ability to drive that change depended directly on the efforts of the educational community; principals, teachers, state and federal governments, and more.


Although both concepts had positive long-term effects, society cannot ignore the obvious reality that roughly 30% of our children, annually, still languish in functional illiteracy; the great majority of whom are poor and of color.


Among the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries, the U.S. ranks 17th in reading, 21st in science, and 26th in math. South Korea tops the rankings, followed by Japan (2nd), Singapore (3rd), and Hong Kong (4th). India is close behind the pack and moving up, having provided many of their young people with solid foundations in math and science.


In engineering specifically, universities in Asian countries now produce eight times as many bachelor’s degrees as the United States. If action is not taken now to change these trends, by 2025 we could find that the ability of U.S. research and education institutions to regenerate has been damaged and that their preeminence has been lost to other areas of the world.


We can continue to spend billions of dollars on programs of questionable effect: creating new schools, training more teachers, designing new curriculum's, and securing more vouchers. However, until entrepreneurial innovation can empower students and create opportunities for them to exercise autonomy and make a difference in their own lives, we as a society will continue to fail in our constant efforts to reform education in America.


Education will not be improved through “cute” or “nice” efforts. This country will not generate the kind of educational results it wants and needs unless it radically changes the way it goes about schooling; unless virtually all school incorporate major new elements.


ROUSIX’s core objective is to assist in the renovation of American public education by implementing better supplemental methods for learning, understanding, and retaining information. This assistance will help ensure that all of our children have an equal chance to succeed in a country whose own success depends on that very outcome.

ROUSIX -- A Product That Will Forever Change How Children Are Educated

ROUSIX’s core objective is to assist in the renovation of American public education by implementing better supplemental methods for learning, understanding, and retaining information. This assistance will help ensure that all of our children have an equal chance to succeed in a country whose own success depends on that very outcome. 

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